Writing

Chris McDonald is a young author working mostly in novels, though also in short stories and poems. He has studied a the Masters of Creative Writing course offered by the University of Technology, Sydney.

He is currently in contact with agents and publishers over his 2nd novel, The Hanging Gardens, a sci-fi thriller. When all hell breaks lose on a science colony orbiting the sun, all the engineer wants is to abandon ship with his maintenance team. However, he and his team are the only ones who can save the scientist and the families from what they have created.

Meanwhile he is working on his third novel. A thief who is sent to kill a fortune teller -only to learn that the woman is his only chance of getting his brother out of prison.

Timeline of Works

September 2016:
The Market is published in the Short and Twisted Anthology.

April 2016:
No More Piano Lessons receives a prize from the Rhonda Jankovic Literary Awards

2016:
Chris begins working on his third novel, about crime, fortune telling, fate and choice. He works mostly on novels throughout the year.

October 2015:
The Market receives a Highly Commended Prize from the Peter Cowan Writer’s Centre, in their Anniversary Competition.

The same month, No More Piano Lessons is shortlisted for the QUT Postgraduate Prize.

March 2015:
Chris begins a Masters of Creative Writing at UTS,

2014:
Hanging Gardens first draft is completed.

2013:
Work widens from Poetry: Is, The Rich and the Homeless; and short stories: Officer Campbell; to also include articles. The dangers of Globalisation, C.D.McDonald reviews Alladin.

Work begins in earnest on a new novel under the working title Tirus Hanging Gardens. The novel’s title is the name of a spacecraft which researches bio-engineered crops for space colonisation.¬† Jason Marquez is part of an emergency maintenance crew sent to replace the¬†Hanging Gardens’ environmental controls, when they learn that the damage was sabotage. Soon Jason finds himself not only struggling to repair the vessel, but investigating a conspiracy. He’s a rescue officer, but even he’s not trained to deal with augmented commandos, unrestrained AIs, hungry biological experiments, mind-controlling psychics or deception from within his own team.
Tirus Hanging Gardens plays with these tropes, creating an anthology of Sci Fi’s themes condensed into one action-packed story.

2012:
Design degree concludes. Outlining of a new novel-length work begins.

Winter in Japan, and Sailor to the Blizzard are examples of poems also being written this year.

2011:
Chris travels to Korea on exchange to Yonsei University and undergoes a poetry and fiction class taught by American Poet Loren Goodman.
Some of the work written for that class includes:
Two Planes out of Sydney, a story about breakup and saying goodbye.
Retreat, a Hemingway imitation, subtly depicts a couple’s stay in the bush and their thoughts about their future.
El Toro Blanco, and The Way it Works are some of the poems written for this class and are the beginning of a poetry streak that would continue into the future.

2010:
Advocate is rewritten and reworked, amassing to over 200,000 words. As is natural for first novels, it is submitted but does not find a place with a publisher. Chris begins to study a Bachelor of Design at UTS, majoring in Architecture.

2009:
Chris travels throughout South America, spending most of his time in Peru but also Colombia, Brazil, Bolivia, Cuba and Argentina.

2008:
Stormtossed short-story completed. A contemporary Da Vinci figure is brought back to life in the future in order to complete one of his most ambitions inventions. However, the melancholy of the future state and his many-times-great-granddaughter convince him to sabotage the machine.

2005:
Started work on Advocate, an epic action novel about an Australian conscripted into war in 2035. Tom Jacka deceives the invaders, intentionally shutting down the SAM station he commands in order to draw in the enemy’s jets. He then reactivates the defenses and destroys a significant portion of the enemy’s paratroopers. The events make him a poster boy for the Australian defense, a hero. Yet as he engages the invaders in brutal infantry on infantry combat, Jacka finds that the ideal of a hero is very different from his experience as a soldier.

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